Fun Facts
Fun Facts

Tokyo Pop Trivia

AKA:
Tokyo Pop Picture
1988
Trivia, fun facts and more for the 1988 Dance / Music movie starring Carrie Hamilton, Diamond Yukai, Hiroshi Kobayashi et al.
Contributed by: Kiki
The guitarist for X (later to be known as X-Japan), hide, always spells his name with a lower case 'h'; that's just how it's done. This may not seem like a big deal, but for hard core hide fans, it is.
Rewind Archive
Carrie Hamilton is the real life daughter of legendary comedian Carol Burnett. Carrie wrote the song "Never Forget" which she sings at the end of the movie. Sadly, Carrie Hamilton died this year, January 20th 2002, of lung and brain cancer.
Rewind Archive
Yutaka Tadokoro, "Hiro", was at the time in a famous Japanese band called the Red Warriors. He was most recently seen in 1998's "Samurai Fiction", a humerous homage to Samurai movies.
Rewind Archive
Fran Rubel Kuzui, who wrote and directed "Tokyo Pop", as well as directing the 1992, manga-like "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" is now an executive producer of the highly successful t.v. shows "Buffy The Vampire Slayer" and "Angel".
Contributed by: Teresa Parks
Carrie Hamilton can also be seen in Seasons 5 & 6 on the hit TV show "Fame" - which was based on the hit movie.
Contributed by: Em
The members of X who were featured in Tokyo Pop were: Toshi, Yoshiki, Taiji and Pata. Hide, guitarist, is the one in the back with all the hair who is hiding from view. At the filming, hide would have been a new member of the band and the band would have been two years away from their amazingly successful independent release, Vanishing Vision. Hikaru, ex-X member, is also featured in the next scene of the movie.
Contributed by: Em
"Papaya Paranoia" is also featured in the movie; they're the female-lead band at the beginning of the film as Wendy is getting to Japan.
Rewind Archive
Yutaka Tadokoro can currently be seen in the critically acclaimed Bill Murray film, 'Lost in Translation', playing a commercial director.
Contributed by: Frank R.
Carrie Hamilton's final contribution to the arts was the hit play she co-wrote with her mother, "Hollywood Arms".
Tokyo Pop