This is topic An Unmarried Woman 1978 in forum « 70's Movies at iRewind Talk.


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Posted by Muffy Tepperman (Member # 1551) on :
 
this was on tv the other night, Jill Clayborn.....I really liked it........I love movies set in NYork.

When I researched it, seems it was up for a ton of awards at the time.

Does anyone have any suggestions of movies like this I might like from that time??

minus the humor haha it reminded me alot of a Woody Allen movie......ny setting.....men/woman relationships....it didn;t even feel too dated to me for some reason?? loved her and her daughter playing the Beatles at the piano!
 
Posted by 80'sRocked (Member # 6979) on :
 
Have not seen that one...good you say.
 
Posted by Muffy Tepperman (Member # 1551) on :
 
yes I say........haha

jill clayborn is great........her husband cheats and she pretty much has to learn to live a new life meets and artist.......and learns to live for herself.......it was great...........even the end was beautiful and simple........rent it tell me what ya think 80'srocked!
 
Posted by StevenHW (Member # 509) on :
 
I have seen it SEVERAL times back in the late-70's! Great film, and probably the best thing Jill Clayburgh ever did in her career. I have not seen it on home video (VHS or DVD), though.

It is interesting that Muffy thought this movie had a Woody Allen-ish vibe to it. Michael Murphy played the cheating husband, and Murphy has been in several of Woody's movies too.

Whenever I see a 70's movie that takes place in New York --- and there was a lot of them! --- I find myself wishing I was living (or at least, visiting) NYC during that era. Well, I was alive in the 70's, but have never been to NYC. So I am left to just imagine what it was like, and movies such as this one gives me that glimpse of what once was. It may have been a crazy time back then, but certainly impressionable.

Alan Bates is very good as the artist and new love of Jill's life. IIRC, the female therapist Jill meets with, was a real-life psychiatric therapist.

The movie's IMDB page:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0078444/
 
Posted by 80'sRocked (Member # 6979) on :
 
Well then. Looks like I have to find a copy and check it out.
 
Posted by Muffy Tepperman (Member # 1551) on :
 
Hey Steven............list me some movies you might think I like with that theme.......very cool you agree with it being an outstanding movie.......Alan Bates was pretty handsome in his beardy artsy 70's style haha [Smile]
 
Posted by LaneyDiamond (Member # 7161) on :
 
I loved this film when I saw it on tv, (when we first got cable here in the UK). Used to watch it over and over. Along with 'Hair' and 'Young Frankenstein'.

She was also good in Silver Streak with Gene Wilder.

Yes Alan Bates was very scrummy when he was young, not so much now though!!!
 
Posted by logan5 (Member # 1467) on :
 
quote:
list me some movies you might think I like with that theme
What theme in particular were you referring to?
quote:
Whenever I see a 70's movie that takes place in New York --- and there was a lot of them! --- I find myself wishing I was living (or at least, visiting) NYC during that era.
Ironically, New York was practically bankrupt at the time, and large sections of the city were crumbling into chaos. The funny thing is, whenever I see movies from that time New York seems like the most appealing place ever! Maybe there was something in the air?
 
Posted by Muffy Tepperman (Member # 1551) on :
 
Hey Logan,
Does anyone have any suggestions of movies like this I might like from that time?? thats what I was asking........i'm not as familiar with 70's movies.......I was born in 77.......you know a 80's movie I found similar being it was all over NY and a drama........AfterHours........one of my favorites.
 
Posted by logan5 (Member # 1467) on :
 
Ah, ok well, there are a ton of films that deal with people trying to have relationships in the confusion of the post-sixties 'modern' world. In no particular order, and ignoring Woody Allen's stuff ('Annie Hall'/'Manhatten', etc), we also have...

Neil Simon's stuff: I love his films, even when they aren't that good. I think he writes better dialogue than almost anyone else. As far as I'm concerned 'The Goodbye Girl' is still one of the best romantic comedies ever written. Other films that carry a simliar vibe are 'Chapter Two' (slightly more dramatic) 'Only When I laugh', and Chevy and Goldie in 'Seems Like Old Times' (straight comedy). I also like 'I Ought to Be in Pictures' even though it's a weaker film.

Sub Woody Allen we have people like...

Albert Brooks: 'Modern Romance' works quite well.

Alan Alda: 'Same Time Next Year' and 'The Four Seasons' are pretty entertaining.

Both brooks and Alda can annoy people, though. You either don't mind them and can enjoy their films or they grate on you and you can't. I guess Woody has a similar effect too.

Another one from Clayburgh that I always had a soft spot for: 'Starting Over', a rarely seen rom-com with Boyt Reynolds! (Pre 'tache, post dead mammal lying on his skull).

Not all of the above are New York movies ('Goodbye Girl' is, as is 'Only When I Laugh' - I think), but they're all relationship-y and fairly sharply written.

I also throw in anything with Dudley Moore from '10' up to (but excluding) 'Best Defense'.

I may have gone off track and cast the net a bit too wide with all of that, but there's gold in them thar hills! (Mixed metaphors!)
 
Posted by jdocster04 (Member # 5752) on :
 
Hey I just thought... A good movie that shows NY from the 70s is Saturday Night Fever... Yeah baby!

Night fever, night fever
We know how to do it
Gimme that night fever, night fever
We know how to show it

EVERYBODY!

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by ISIS (Member # 1780) on :
 
Try :

The Goodbye Girl

It came out in 1977, it is set in New York, and it's by Neil Simon, and has Marsha Mason and Richard Dreyfuss in it.
 
Posted by Muffy Tepperman (Member # 1551) on :
 
Saturday Night Fever is a given!! [Smile]

Thanks Logan exactly what I was thinking.......I love Woody Allen movies so you can't go wrong a friend at work actually told me about Starting Over,
"('Goodbye Girl' is, as is 'Only When I Laugh' - I think)"
I'm definatly gonna check these out too.....I'm not much of a Dudley Moore fan though.......I will let you know what I watch thanks Logan!
 
Posted by 80'sRocked (Member # 6979) on :
 
Just found a copy of An Unmarried Woman for the grand ole price of $4.00...can't beat that. I'll let you all know what I think of it after I watch it.
 
Posted by Muffy Tepperman (Member # 1551) on :
 
cool 80's rocked..........did you find it online? or actually somewhere?
 
Posted by 80'sRocked (Member # 6979) on :
 
Online - I rarely buy ANYTHING in stores anymore.
 
Posted by 80'sRocked (Member # 6979) on :
 
Just watched this one and here are my opinions on it:
Overall, it was well written and very good acting. There were times when I thought it was very good, then stall for a while, good again, etc. Then again, most movies are like that. It did get a bit too "sappy" at times for me as most of it is through the eyes of a woman. Not that there's anything wrong with that, but I don't watch many movies like this. With that said, it wasn't bad and definitely worth watching. I think I'll stop here because it feels like I'm writing a review. [Wink]
 
Posted by StevenHW (Member # 509) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by 80'sRocked:
Just watched this one and here are my opinions on it:
[snip]...Overall, it was well written and very good acting. There were times when I thought it was very good, then stall for a while, good again, etc. Then again, most movies are like that. It did get a bit too "sappy" at times for me as most of it is through the eyes of a woman. Not that there's anything wrong with that, but I don't watch many movies like this. With that said, it wasn't bad and definitely worth watching...[snip]

Considering that the movie was written and directed by Paul Mazursky, this "sappyness" is usually normal for his films. Partly, it's because his films usually deal with personal romantic and sexual relationships between people.

That said, this is one of his better films.
 
Posted by 80'sRocked (Member # 6979) on :
 
Gotcha Steven. I think this is the first one I saw by Paul Mazursky. Like I said, it was well written and worth watching.
 
Posted by Muffy Tepperman (Member # 1551) on :
 
pretty awesome 80'srocked!! you watched a movie I said I liked and wrote a great review! only because you seem to know sooooooo many movies.

so I just looked up Mazursky because I really didn't know much of him. Bob and Ted Carol and Alice hahaha he wrote that? I just saw about it not long ago on the IFC indie sex documentary. (which was pretty awesome)and Down and Out in Beverly Hills too??

I really did love the feel of Unmarried woman maybe it is me being a woman and that whole sappyness [Smile] ........more like i've had my heartbroken and learned it's all about me, myself and I [Smile] Which is why I loved the ending so much too
 
Posted by 80'sRocked (Member # 6979) on :
 
***************** SPOILER ALERT **********
I was shocked at the ending. I thought for sure she was going to go with him, especially after her friend pretty much told her she was nuts if she didn't.

I didn't know Maz wrote and directed Down and Out in Beverly Hills. I've seen that movie numerous times.

[ 25. July 2008, 05:31: Message edited by: 80'sRocked ]
 
Posted by Sam 'The Made Man' Hain (Member # 3150) on :
 
I can't believe that this thread got as big as it did.
 
Posted by Muffy Tepperman (Member # 1551) on :
 
you just made it larger Sam! haha So you dislike the movie then or what Sam?
 
Posted by Sam 'The Made Man' Hain (Member # 3150) on :
 
It's been too long since I've seen it to say either way. Probably been 30 years since I saw it for my first and only time. All I remember is Jill Clayburgh(or her stand in) showed her breasts.

It's probably too much of a chick flick for me to totally enjoy.
 
Posted by P.S. It's Paul.... (Member # 1022) on :
 
Hey Sam, at least a part of the movie got your attention. And they say some flicks have no redeeming features.....

I can't remember if I've ever seen it - might have to take a chance. After all, the worst that can happen is that I lose 2 hours of my life, right?
 
Posted by Muffy Tepperman (Member # 1551) on :
 
haha yeah Paul two hours lost.........you have little girls so i'm sure you watch lots of cartoons and such........it could be a good break...:)plus "stand in breasts" and a sexually experimental divorcee!

I just liked it is all.......and I wanted to voice it and talk about it haha
 
Posted by P.S. It's Paul.... (Member # 1022) on :
 
I wonder - is *stand in breasts* a job description or an activity?

[Eek!] [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Muffy Tepperman (Member # 1551) on :
 
I really thought it was her standing there and not "stand in breasts" but I also wasn't checking them out haha
 
Posted by 80'sRocked (Member # 6979) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by P.S. It's Paul....:
After all, the worst that can happen is that I lose 2 hours of my life, right?

2 hours 4 minutes, to be exact.
 
Posted by Pittsburghgirl (Member # 7514) on :
 
I just finished watching this. While I don't think it is a cinematic masterpiece, it did represent the late 1970's very well. The acting was great, the NY background was great, wardrobe was great. Like 80'sRocked said, it was good at points, but slowed down in other parts. I prefer Jill Clayburgh to Diane Keaton. They were always compared in the 70's and early 80's. Diane Keaton's "routine" has been the same forever- act like a neurotic, flighty woman and flail the arms and hands around . She does it to this day. Jill Clayburgh seemed to be a bit more serious of an actress. Anyhoo, this was a good movie to watch if you want to see life in NY in the late 70's through the eyes of a still wealthy woman, her ex husband, her cute child and her zany friends. My favorite character was Erica's friend Elaine played by Kelly Bishop. I also liked Alan Bates as the new boyfriend.
 
Posted by Logan 5 (Member # 1467) on :
 
I find so many of the then groundbreaking and topical subjects that feature heavily in films like this incredibly dated and hard to watch now. However, Hollywood filmmaking was never better than in the 70's and so many of these movies exude a kind of cinematic quality that is often missing from modern films. And yes, New York in the 70's was absolutely fantastic. A city crumbling from within but oozing character.

I agree about Keaton too, while I still like her she's always been Annie Hall. Then again Woody Allen has always been Woody - not that anyone ever pretended he was a great actor. I have a soft spot for Clayburgh - especially for Silver Streak.
 
Posted by Crash (Member # 7484) on :
 
Jill Clayburgh did some fine work in the 1970s. Her daughter, Lilly Rabe, who looks just like a younger version of Mom, is fantastic on American Horror story. She got Mom's acting ability too.
 
Posted by Pittsburghgirl (Member # 7514) on :
 
Crash, I watched the first 4 seasons of American Horror Story. I did not know, until earlier today , before even checking in here (I was checking out Jill Clayburgh's IMDb page) that Lily Rabe is Clayburgh's daughter! Every time I'd see her onscreen, I'd think "she looks so familiar, what have I seen her in before AHS?" Now it clicks! She looks like her Mother!
Logan, I am total agreement. I have been trying to catch some classic 70's flicks off and on over the past few years. Also early 80's, as I feel some movies still had the late 70's feel. I still have yet to see Only When I Laugh in its entirety. It was in TCM about 6 months ago, and I watched a little bit over my lunch hour, but they never aired it again!
 
Posted by Logan 5 (Member # 1467) on :
 
quote:
Logan, I am total agreement. I have been trying to catch some classic 70's flicks off and on over the past few years. Also early 80's, as I feel some movies still had the late 70's feel. I still have yet to see Only When I Laugh in its entirety.
Early 80's are also great. I am a Neil Simon junkie, and even though many of his films feel like plays (which they often are), and much of the dialogue is snappy 'sparring' - I still love them. Only When I Laugh is good (I think Mason got a nom for it?) as is Chapter Two.

This is a VHS copy download link. It's not great quality, but it's better than nothing:

https://1fichier.com/?0gjae9age6
 
Posted by Pittsburghgirl (Member # 7514) on :
 
Thanks Logan!
 
Posted by Nostalgic for the '80's (Member # 37454) on :
 
I've seen "An Unmarried Woman" a couple of times over the years; the first time was in the 200X's - i.e., long after it came out. Excellent film, and a real time capsule of late '70's NYC. The city may as well have been another character in the film.

This film seems to be a fairly accurate depiction of the changing sexual mores & attitudes in the '70's (that started in the late '60's)....I.e., more couples were divorcing by that time & as such divorced people (especially women) didn't have the stigma that they did in previous decades.

The late Jill Clayburgh was truly gorgeous in the '70's - she also looked fantastic in the film "Silver Streak" (w/Gene Wilder & Richard Pryor, 1976).

For some reason, the final scene with JC walking down the crowded street past those two guys walking with the painting really sticks in my mind...

Over the years I always thought it would be cool to live in NYC at some point, but have never done so - the expense has a lot to do with this - going along with this, getting a good enough job to afford living there would be tough.

[ 04. October 2016, 17:33: Message edited by: Nostalgic for the '80's ]
 


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